Today on the podcast, we had a little bit of an emergency shuffling of the podcasts as I felt this one really needed to go out. 

Obviously, there is a huge issue with Achilles tears in NCAA women’s gymnastics and this is a problem that has been going on for the last four to five seasons. 

Before COVID in 2018, there were about 20 Achilles tears in the first couple of months of the season, which was absolutely devastating to watch. Now as I’m writing this blog post in 2022, we are just a month into the season and again are seeing a massive spike in Achilles tears. 

Since 2018, I have been involved in a ton of work trying to understand and figure out how to help stop so many Achilles tears from happening.

We started a research study in 2018 surveying NCAA gymnasts who tore their Achilles that got published last year in Sports Health, I wrote a monster blog breaking Achilles Tear research and talked with a world-leading expert on tendon injuries to get her thoughts.

Due to the continued high rate of Achilles tears in Women’s NCAA gymnastics, and some updates that have occurred with our research, I wanted to put out another very important lecture for free so people in gymnastics can understand some of the main issues we face.

The lecture below actually is one that I gave to all of the NCAA College Gymnastics Coaches last year when our research paper on Achilles studies, Achilles tears, and NCAA Gymnastics was being published. 

I wasn’t able to share this as a podcast because we had not yet published our paper, but now that it’s out, and many people have read it and have talked about it, I can share this lecture. 

I actually re-recorded it and spent an uncomfortable amount of time updating the slides and adjusting this lecture because I think that we really need to be able to look at the evidence and the science from a good point of view and take practical applications. 

I also don’t want people to jump to conclusions about what we do know and what we don’t know, about Achilles tears in NCAA women’s gymnastics. Honestly, there are some large gaps in the literature, which I’ll explain in the podcast. 

This lecture gives an outline of my ideas, shares conversations with world experts on Achilles’ tendons, and summarizes and presents the research in a way for people to think about them.

As well as provide some options for what we can do, both before and during College Gymnastics to possibly start reducing the risk of tears happening.

I really would appreciate it if everyone shared this episode, I make zero money off these podcasts, I just desperately want more research on this subject to be funded. 

If more people understand the challenging conversations that I think need to be had about how we can reduce the risk of not only Achilles ruptures, but all injuries in and out of College Gymnastics, we can make a positive impact on the sport.

I discuss;

  • What are the rates of Achilles tears in NCAA Women’s Gymnastics?
  • What are the possible risk factors?
  • What might be going on pre-NCAA in club/elite gymnastics that influences tears
  • What might be going on during NCAA, like season density, that influences tear risk
  • The findings of our latest NCAA Achilles Tear paper, and what those results mean.
  • What can be done to help reduce the risk of Achilles tears, related to strength and conditioning and workload management

If you want to watch the podcast, be sure to check out the YouTube video where the lecture is up for free!

Achilles Tears in NCAA Gymnastics – A Must Have Conversation

 

 

Part One:

COMBATTING ACHILLES TEARS IN NCAA GYMNASTICS (PART 1)

Part Two:

PROFESSOR JILL COOK ON ACHILLES TENDON INJURIES, ACHILLES TEAR RISK FACTORS, RISK REDUCTION

RELATED EPISODE:

How To Train Harder and Smarter Using Workloads with Tim Gabbett and Scott Willgress – https://youtu.be/iFmKgghnpAs

 

 

Hope it helps!

– Dave

Dr. Dave Tilley DPT, SCS, CSCS
CEO/Founder of SHIFT Movement Science

 

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